The difference between marketing and advertising (and why it matters)

Tweet Marketing and advertising are distinct majors in college. Most agencies are advertising agencies, and most departments inside companies that promote the sale of product are marketing departments. Why the distinction? Are these two words synonyms, or is there a real difference? A high-level, ephemeral topic like this isn’t something marketers spend most of their time thinking about. They’re too heads down, focused on budgets and marketing automation and copywriting. I know I am. But I recently started taking MMC 5435: Messaging Strategy and the Centrality of the Value Proposition, part of the Communicating Value and Web Conversion graduate certificate created by MECLABS Institute (parent research organization of MarketingExperiments) in partnership with the University of Florida. And so lately I’ve been pondering the bigger, more existential copies of marketing, such as this one. Marketing philosophy, if you will. More than just nomenclature To me, marketing is strategy and advertising is (but one) execution of that strategy. Marketing is the strategy of educating customers about a company’s choices in the marketplace, who their product or service will be a good fit for, and who it won’t. Advertising is then used to take that strategy and communicate it to an audience. This is part of the reason that many universities, UF included, place marketing programs in the College of Business and advertising in the College of Journalism and Communications. So both advertising and marketing have the same goal. They both are, essentially, helping enable a choice. Usually in the company’s favor to…
Source: Marketing Experiments
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